Test / Review Ski Atomic Redster Marcel Hirscher SL

Test / Review Ski Atomic Redster Marcel Hirscher SL

 

Mini Atomic - SkiReviewer

The Atomic Redster Marcel Hirscher SL model is not one single but two different skis under one name. And there is a very good reason for that to happen. Marcel Hirscher is a fully endorsed racer under Atomic´s umbrella. That means he has an specific model wearing his very own name. Hirscher has won the last three Overall World Cup title´s and that deserves some recognition. Giving someone’s name to a pair of skis is one of the nicest gifts a brand can make to its sponsored athletes.

 

© ATOMIC Austria GmbH

Atomic Redster Marcel Hirscher SL
© ATOMIC Austria GmbH

Now… two skis, one name, different sizes… who is who in here? Well, let’s see. There are four models, two of them have slalom-like shapes and the other two have giant slalom-like shapes. Since Marcel Hirscher competes in the World Cup Championship and his highlights have occured disputing slalom and giant slalom races, this divide fits like a glove.

 

Slalom shape models:

  • Atomic Redster Marcel Hirscher SL 157
  • Atomic Redster Marcel Hirscher SL 164

 

Giant slalom shape models:

  • Atomic Redster Marcel Hirscher SL 169
  • Atomic Redster Marcel Hirscher SL 176

 

As a result, anyone loving Atomic skis can now buy a pair of skis named in honour of one of the best World Cup skiers (Marcel is the second skier to win three overall titles in a row after Phil Mahre) and be proud every time you look at them. At the same time, there is no big compromise since the election can be done between long turns and short turns. Besides, there is a size that suits everyone´s needs.

By now, some readers may be asking if there is any difference between the Atomic Redster Marcel Hirscher SL and the respective alternatives such as the Redster Doubledeck 3.0 GS and the Redster Doubledeck 3.0 SL. The answer is rather simple: yes, there is; well… there are.

Marcel Hirscher in Sölden - © ATOMIC Austria GmbH

Marcel Hirscher in Sölden
© ATOMIC Austria GmbH

Instead of incorporating all the crown jewels into the Redster Marcel Hirscher SL model, Atomic has built a quite simple ski in terms of “technology”. There is no Ramp technology, there is no special construction method, no reference to metal layers in the Features section, no nothing. Is that a good sign or a bad sign? Well, the molds aren´t that different between those three skis. So from the profile side of things, there aren´t significant changes. However, all could be found inside. From this editor´s perspective, not having the Ramp technology is a clear benefit. If we read the brand´s text about the skis behaviour, we´ll discover that it looks like this ski is closer to a traditional sandwich ski than anything else. The trouble is, without mechanical references, all has to be left to the skier´s feel.

Feelings aside, one thing is clear. If this has to be one of the flagships in the Atomic Race range, why does not it incorporate all the good bits? My answer is simple: because a good designed ski doesn’t need all those super-technologies. A traditional sandwich can be crap or can be glorious. It all depends on the decisions. And the Atomic Redster Marcel Hirscher SL gets the good ones.

With all that said, would I buy this instead of the Redster Doubledeck 3.0 GS or SL? I would for the SL part, but not for the GS, it is too short. But this is a very, very personal decision. Don´t trust me on this one.

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Albert Valbuena - English (84 Posts)

My name is Albert and I am from Barcelona. I started skiing when I was 10. At the age of 32 I started this project called Ski Reviewer after having been professionally involved into the skiing world since 1999. I started from the bottom but after several years of dedication and hard training I achieved the official Ski Instructor Certification (ISIA certified) in 2006 at ETEVA. From then on I spent several seasons as an instructor as well as a kid's trainer in the local club. I was also a member at the core team in the ski resort for racing and events management. That period ended on 2011 and now on 2014 I've started Ski Reviewer.


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