Test / Review Ski Fischer RC4 Superior Pro

Test / Review Ski Fischer RC4 Superior Pro

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The Fischer RC4 Superior Pro is a Race class ski on its own right. It does not follow any prestablished premise and its sidecut and profile are unique in the Fischer Race range. It is hard to figure out who is this ski aimed to, since in the rest of the range there is a good repertoire covering everyone’s needs.

The sidecut in the Fischer RC4 Superior Pro starts with a generous 122 mm shovel, followed by a 72 mm waist and closes with a 104 mm tail. With only 15 m radius in 170 cm, it is clear enough that this ski is aimed for those willing to make some nice carved turns. Despite that first impression, when compared to the rest of the race range at Fischer it seems this has been a design intended to be “the middle path” between the GS and SL-like models. The brand has chosen a wide profile, giving the Fischer RC4 Superior Pro a more open use case scope without losing the race character.

Fischer RC4 Superior Pro  © Fischer Sports GmbH

Fischer RC4 Superior Pro
© Fischer Sports GmbH

The size offering is more than complete. Everyone will find the right size since lengths start at 155 cm and end at the 180 cm. We’ll find a new size every 5 cm. Six sizes in total, which is good if you intend to sell a lot of skis.

In the technology department, Fischer has given the Fischer RC4 Superior Pro a similar construction as in the high end models. A sandwich construction with a wood core, metal layer, synthetic fiber plus a sintered base conform the pattern. Differences? Well, the wood distribution in the core is simplier in the Fischer RC4 Superior range. The use of fiber is a bit lower in order to smooth the ski’s reactions. This is noticeable also in the metal layer thickness, wich falls at 0.5 mm. That is a defining factor to the skis behaviour. A thicker layer wasn’t necessary since the skis reactions are not harsh and it could’ve made the whole combo more rigid and a bit more difficult to ski.

Let’s not forget the Hole Ski Technology. When the “less is more” idea strikes back, things can get messy. A hole is a hole, here and everywhere. The “emptyness” has never been an attractive sales factor. And beyond Fischer’s willingness to make this “hole thing” a differentiation factor in trying to boost their sales, no mechanical miracle in the ski design industry seems to have happened yet. If it did not happen some decades ago when Fischer used this “Hole Technology”, my bet is that nothing remarkable won’t happen. Again.

For the binding-plate interface, the Fischer RC4 Superior Pro is using the Racetrack plate. It is a middle range plate that allows the ski to freely bend when pushed hard while at the same time it transmits every single skier’s order to the plank. It is a very easy to adjust in size system and everyone with two free fingers will be able to perform the operation. Just make sure the rail has no snow inside the holes and the side rails to ensure an easy adjustment.

This post is also available in Versión en Español.

Albert Valbuena - English (84 Posts)

My name is Albert and I am from Barcelona. I started skiing when I was 10. At the age of 32 I started this project called Ski Reviewer after having been professionally involved into the skiing world since 1999. I started from the bottom but after several years of dedication and hard training I achieved the official Ski Instructor Certification (ISIA certified) in 2006 at ETEVA. From then on I spent several seasons as an instructor as well as a kid's trainer in the local club. I was also a member at the core team in the ski resort for racing and events management. That period ended on 2011 and now on 2014 I've started Ski Reviewer.


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